Category Flowers

Purple lock
Flowers

Purple lock

Violet lock: Violet is commonly called "bee flower", as it is traditionally planted near beehives in order to attract and feed bees. The story passes on the violacciocca as a favorite flower of Charlemagne. It is a very popular flower in the United Kingdom, where the plant is used to decorate the walls of the cottages.

Read More

Flowers

Thrush

Lily of the valley: It is a synonym of returning happiness and good luck charm. In France, during the feast of May 1st, he offers himself for good wishes. According to a legend San Leonardo had to fight against the devil with the appearance of a devil. He won, but the fight was difficult and the drops of his blood on the ground turned into white bells.
Read More
Flowers

Waterlily

Water Lily: The Greeks attributed to the flower anti-aphrodisiac qualities; in Greek mythology it is considered the symbol of unrequited love, but also of platonic love. The Egyptians chose this flower to decorate, painting the walls of the tombs of the pharaohs. In the East, the water lily symbolizes the dawn, the arrival of the sun; some varieties open when the sun rises and then close again at sunset.
Read More
Flowers

Pomegranate

Pomegranate: Linnaeus, botanist and naturalist, called it Punica granatum, thinking it was of African origin; it seems that the Romans had discovered the pomegranate in Carthage and had not hesitated to call it the most delicious fruit of the Mediterranean; however the pomegranate comes from Afghanistan and Persia.
Read More
Flowers

Mauve

Mallow: Mallow The name Malva comes from the Greek word malakos, which means soothing and sweet. The name of the plant shows the properties that have always been recognized to the same and to the infusions obtained with its flowers, that is to say an effective remedy against pain and against inflammation; the Ancient Greeks used to eat mallow seeds and pack infusions with them, which were then used to calm the cough, as well as various types of inflammation.
Read More
Flowers

Daisy

Margherita: It is said to have a prophetic faculty. Lovers browse through it to find out if their love is reciprocated. In the Middle Ages, women publicly acknowledged that they were loved and returned when they gave their knight permission to adorn their shield with two daisies.
Read More
Flowers

Myrtle

Myrtle: The ancient Greeks believed that those who cultivated, those who seized myrtle, those who used it to embellish the house and clothes were accompanied by energy, vigor and power. In Athens, winning men like athletes or victorious warriors wore their heads with a crown of myrtle. Myrtle is a symbol of love and vitality.
Read More
Flowers

Mimosa

Mimosa: In England, in the last century, the less attractive girls used to put an acacia flower in the eyelet of the jacket, the blouse or in the hair to show off their ideology. Different meaning was attributed to the mimosa by the American Indians; on the basis of an old custom a branch of acacia was given by every young man to the girl who had set his heart on fire.
Read More
Flowers

Oleander

Oleander: The plant has always been known for its poisonousness; already Pliny the Elder spoke of a non-commercial, poisonous honey, as it is produced by bees with the nectar of oleander flowers. In India it is considered a funerary flower; according to an ancient legend, the heroine who goes to die suicide carries on her head a crown composed of oleander flowers.
Read More
Flowers

Lavender

Lavender has become part of the popular tradition thanks to its delicate, fresh and persistent fragrance. In fact, it has always been used to perfume linen; once dried, its flowers are mostly collected in small bags and then placed in drawers and cupboards.
Read More
Flowers

Magnolia

Magnolia: It grows spontaneously in Louisiana. In the last century, in Georgia, it was believed that the presence of a magnolia in the home garden was auspicious and was as important as the pillars of the house itself. In Europe it was imported, in 1740, by a trader who traveled between the Old and the New Continent.
Read More
Flowers

Achillea

The common name of the plant is to be traced back to the simple and singular form of its leaves at the same time; it is, in fact, countless filaments, similar to hair. Furthermore, it has always been renowned for its curative and medicinal properties, first of all the ability to stop the flow of blood (coagulating power); wraps made from the leaves of the plant were used in ancient times to treat soldiers' wounds.
Read More
Flowers

Peony

Peony: A thousand virtues have been attributed to this plant, widespread in Europe even in the wild, since ancient times; besides being used as a painkiller, it was said that a twig tied to the neck of the mad could cure them of madness. Pliny the Elder speaks of it as the plant of the god Peone, doctor of the gods to whom he owes the name.
Read More
Flowers

Poppy

Poppy: Poppy rhoeas is the genus that commonly flowers in the fields of Asia and Europe. It is an extremely simple flower that has always been the subject of legends and popular beliefs. The mythological tradition handed down the poppy as the flower of consolation, so much so that it is said that Demeter, the Goddess of the fields and crops, regained her serenity following the death of her daughter only by drinking poppy infusions.
Read More
Flowers

Flox

Flox: The name of the plant comes from the Latin term phlox, which means flame and which recalls the shape and colors of its flowers. In medieval times the knights, on the occasion of parties and receptions, used to adorn their clothes with Phlox flowers, flowers whose beauty and aroma were particularly appreciated by the Ladies.
Read More
Flowers

Petunia

Petunia: It is native to Brazil, where it grows spontaneously on the edge of the forests. In Europe the petunia came about thanks to the courage and audacity of the botanist-explorers, who went deep into the forests, risking their lives, to discover new types and varieties of plants they did not know existed.
Read More
Flowers

Do not forget me

Don't forget me The European tradition traces the meaning of this flower to an Austrian legend, according to which one day two lovers, while walking along the Danube, exchanging promises and tenderness, were fascinated by the large amount of blue flowers that were transported from the current.
Read More
Flowers

Narcissus

Narcissus: The meaning of this flower, that is self-esteem, vanity and inability to love, is to be traced back to the story of Narcissus, a young and splendid shepherd of whom Ovid speaks in the third book of Metamorphosis. Narcissus is represented as a very vain boy who is completely amazed by his own beauty and unable, precisely because of this, to steal the life and feelings that his beauty aroused in all the girls.
Read More
Flowers

Potentilla

Potentilla: The name Potentilla is of Latin origin and is composed of the root potentia, that is power and strength, and of the ending -illa, which is a diminutive; literally, therefore, means great strength in a small flower. The symbolic meaning attributed to the potentilla is that of maternal love; it seems, in fact, that when it rains, the leaves are enclosed above the flower as if to protect it.
Read More
Flowers

Wisteria

Wisteria: The scientific name is wisteria, assigned to the wisteria in honor of the great anthropologist Kaspar Wistar. Wisteria grows on the east coast of the United States, from where it was imported into Europe in the 1700s. Only a century later, however, when the splendid Asian varieties arrived from the East, and more precisely from China and Japan, the wisteria began to to be truly appreciated by Europeans.
Read More
Flowers

Rose

Rose: Queen of flowers, the rose can take on different meanings according to its own colors; so for example the red rose symbolizes love, passion; the yellow one jealousy and infidelity at the same time; the white one of chastity and purity; in the language of flowers, the pink rose means charm and sweetness.
Read More