Category Flowers

Crocus
Flowers

Crocus

Crocus: Already known in the times of the Greeks, it is a widespread flower throughout the Mediterranean basin, from Asia Minor to Northern Africa. Its name derives from the Greek kroke, which means filament, just to represent the long stigmas that characterize its flower. Homer describes the nuptial thalamus of Jupiter and Juno covered with so many flowers including the crocus.

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Flowers

Farferugine

Farferugine: Also known as the marsh calta, the Farferugine was associated by the poets of antiquity with gold, precisely because its golden flowers, which grew rigorously along the banks of the rivers, referred their thoughts to the precious metal. Hence the meaning of the flower: greed for wealth.
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Flowers

Hellebore

Hellebore: Elleboro is a plant to which numerous properties are attributed and in particular the laxative effect and the high relaxing power, almost of tranquilizer, which herbal teas made with its leaves and roots are able to provide. And it is precisely with reference to these properties that a value commonly attributed to Elleboro is that of liberation from anguish.
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Flowers

Datura

Datura: Datura La Datura is a flower known since ancient times; already the Aztecs use its leaves and seeds, with a strong narcotizing power, especially during religious rites, for which great involvement and absolute abandonment to the needs of the gods was required. The use of Datura soon spread to our continent.
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Flowers

Sunflower

Sunflower: It is a flower that has ancient origins: in North America remains of this flower have been found that date back to three thousand years before Christ. The American Indians considered it a sacred plant as it allowed man to make multiple uses. In PerŅ‰ it is the emblem of the Sun God.
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Flowers

Jasmine

Jasmine: Ancient traces of jasmine have been found in Egypt; tiny fragments were found on the mummy of a pharaoh in the necropolis of Deir-el-Bahri. In Europe it came perhaps from the Indies. In Tuscany, in 1500, a noble planted a splendid specimen in his garden, forbidding his gardener to reproduce that plant; the gardener's fiancée, disobeying the order of the Lord, stole a sprig from it, replanted it; he succeeded in reproducing jasmine and began to sell cuttings; in this way she got rich and managed to marry her boyfriend.
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Flowers

Acorn

Acorn: At one time, acorns were used for human and animal nutrition; bread was also made with acorn flour. However, these fruits take their meaning from the tree on which they grow; for many peoples the oak was a cosmic tree, which represented the union of the divine world with the earthly world; its fruit is a symbol of the presence of divinity, a symbol of life and eternity.
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Flowers

Yevpatoria

Eupatoria: Eupatoria is renowned since ancient times for the medical and curative properties that characterize it. With infusions and ointments made with the flowers and roots of the plant in the past in Europe and Africa, they used to treat various ailments, including liver disease and pain caused by wounds and tissue lacerations.
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Flowers

Gentian

Gentian: The name gentian derives from Gentius, the last Illyrian king who reigned between 180 and 167 BC .; he was the first to discover the medicinal properties of the root of this flower. In the 16th century, the yellow gentian lutea was used to fight the plague. Today, with its roots, bitters, digestives and aperitifs are prepared.
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Flowers

Geranium

Geranium: Geranium first appeared in Europe between the end of the 1600s and the beginning of the 1700s. The beauty of the flower was not immediately appreciated but only after some decades. The reputation of the geranium reached its peak during the Victorian era, when, especially in Britain, but also in the rest of Europe, the mansion gardens of the lords were embellished and enriched with every known variety of geranium.
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Flowers

Cornflower

Cornflower: Some remains of this flower date back to the Neolithic era, its origins are very ancient. He is nicknamed "spell grass". A legend tells that the goddess Flora, having found the body of her beloved Cyanus dead in a field full of cornflowers, wanted to call those flowers with her name; the scientific name is in fact Centaurea cyanus.
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Flowers

Hyacinth

Hyacinth: The etymology of the term (the root giak in Greek means dark red) supports the hypothesis according to which in origin the hyacinth was, probably, of red color. This flower was dear to many ancient poets, including Pliny, Virgil and Theocritus, who often cited the flower in their verses.
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Flowers

Fresia

Fresia: Fresia It is native to southern Africa. For centuries it has been a flower whose beauty, smell and color have been neglected. In Italy, yellow freesia grows spontaneously; in Holland, Sweden and Denmark many varieties of freesia are grown with light colors and a delicate fragrance. Due to the fact that it has almost no historical memory, freesia is a symbol of mystery and fascination with the arcane.
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Flowers

Lily

Lily: The lily originates from the Balkan peninsula and from Asia Minor, from where it was imported to the rest of Europe. Tradition has it that the lily, originally, was a white and candid flower, which is precisely why the lily is a symbol of purity for Christians. In this regard, it is important to note that San Giuseppe is often represented with a stick from which white lilies sprout.
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Flowers

Chrysanthemum

On this page we will talk about: In Italy the chrysanthemum blooms at the end of October and due to the concomitance of flowering with the celebration of the dead it is customary to attribute to this flower a fatal meaning. In reality, however, the name, which derives from the Greek, literally means golden flower and has therefore been associated by tradition with absolutely positive values.
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Flowers

Iris

Iris: Greek mythology has called Iris, the messenger of the Gods, and that is the divinity that, using the rainbow as a passage, allowed the "dialogue" between Olympus and Earth. The flower of the iris was so named because the multiplicity of its colors recalled, precisely, the colors of the rainbow.
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Flowers

Carnation

There are numerous meanings attributed to this flower over the centuries. The mythology links the carnation to the goddess of the hunt, Diana; in fact it is handed down that a young shepherd madly in love with the Goddess, was first seduced by him and then cruelly abandoned; from the shed tears of the young man who died of passion, it is said that beautiful flowers were born: carnations.
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Flowers

Lappio

Lappio: Lappio is a very common flower, which together with daisies and poppies colors the fields at the beginning of spring, continuing to bloom throughout the summer season. In some areas, where the climate remains particularly mild throughout the year, the Lappio flowers even during the winter.
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Flowers

Nasturtium

Nasturtium: Originally from the countries of Central and South America, the Nasturtius reached our continent along with many other typical products of those countries such as tobacco, cotton, etc. Initially in Europe it was cultivated as a vegetable and therefore commonly used also in the kitchen.
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Flowers

Calla

Until the early 1900s, it was believed that the calla and the aquatic arum belonged to the same genus. The German botanist Karl Sprengel was the first to state that the calla and the aquatic arum were not so similar; in fact, there were numerous botanical differences that characterized the two flowers.
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Flowers

Lotus

Lotus: Among the Orientals the lotus is an expression of the perfection and purity of the sun, of the sky, of creation, of the past, of the present and of the future, that is, in one word of life itself and of all the virtues to it, directly or indirectly, referable. For this reason it is considered a sacred flower, the flower of the Gods.
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